About your Search

20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
yamanaka. >> suarez: the two scientists are from two different generations and celebrated today's announcement half a world apart. but today they were celebrated together for their research that led to a ground-breaking understanding of how cells work. sir john gurdon of cambridge university was awarded for his work in 1962. he was able to use specialized cells of frogs, like skin or intestinal cells, to generate new tad poles and show d.n.a. could drive the formation of cells in the body. 40 years later dr. shinya yamanaka built on that and went further. he was able to turn mature cells back into their earliest form as primitive cells. those cells are in many ways the equivalent of embryonic stem cells because they have the potential to develop into specialized cells. for heart, liver and other organs. dr. shinya yamanaka is currently working at kyoto university. embryonic stem cells have had to be harvested from human embryos, a source of debate and considerably controversy. for gurdon the prize at special meaning. at a news conference in london he recalled one school teacher'
earned scientists the nobelrize p in medicine today. john gurdob and shinya yamanaka said mature cells can be turned into new tissue. the nobel committee said they revolutionized the understanding of how cells develop. scientists are now using their research to treat diseases, including par kin sons and diabetes. >>> big celebrations today in venezuela following the re-election of hugo chavez. the controversial leader is set to rule that oil-rich country for another six years. but as nbc's carey sanders reports, opposition by his own people is stronger than ever. >> reporter: fireworks filled the skies. as the street fight continued well into the early morning hours. a chavez victory say supporters means his brand of socialism is here to stay. >> we're living socially. >> reporter: hugo chavez, 58 years old, a star among the poor in south america, was himself surrounded by a hollywood star sunday, actor danny glover. a chavez supporter. for almost 14 years, the revolution has captured the imagination of the core here, in large part because he's taken this nation's oil wealth and used i
to two scientists sharing the prize, john gurdon and japan's shinya yamanaka won for stem cell research, discovered that mature specialized cells can be reprogrammed to become immature cells capable of developing into all other tissue cells. congratulations to them. >>> the obama campaign is launching attack ad in virginia slamming mitt romney's foreign policy credentials ahead of romney's speech on foreign policy this morning. the obama camp claims romney's overseas trips have been reckless and amateurish. >>> the bronx bombers bats woke up in the ninth. the yankees scored five runs in the final frame to beat the orioles. take a 1-0 lead in the division series. in the national league the cincinnati reds are one win away from playing the pennant. crushed the giants behind pitcher bronson arroyo. he gave up just a sill hit in seven innings. >> anything -- >> won the world series in 2004 and 2007 -- >> just has to work it in, no matter what. what about the red sox? >> won in 2004 and 2007. >> so long ago. >> i know. >> 2004. >> yeah. i think i had 16 children in between them. >> come on.
the nobel prize in physiology of medicine. japan's shinya yamanaka shares the honor with britain's john b. gurdon. both discovered specialized cells that make up the body. >> the nobel assembly has today decided to award the nobel prize in physiology or medicine 2012 jointly to john b. gurdon and shinya yamanaka. >> the nobel assembly in stockholm, sweden, made the announcement monday. yamanaka is 50 years old. he's a professor at kyoto university. he established the method to produce a new type of cells called induced pluripotent stem cells, or isp. they're capable of becoming specialized cells which can be used to create tissue for neurons and heart muscle. john b. gurdon was the first one to discover that it might contain all the information found in an organism in 1962. 40 years later, yamanaka confirmed and expanded on gurdon's thesis. professor yamanaka spoke about his nobel prize win at kyoto university. >> translator: i am very happy about receiving this prize. but at the same time, i feel a great sense of responsibility. ips is a new technology, and it has a lot of potential in t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)